Stir fried Bird’s Nest Fern

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The first time I tried this wild vegetable which Taiwanese call Shan Su Cai (山稣菜) was in Hualien’s Taroko National Park.  I was told it is rarely available because people have to climb up hilly slopes to harvest it in the wild.  To my surprise, I found it in the local market this morning, so naturally, I had to buy 2 bundles (ntd 60 which is about usd 2) to try.

Bird's Nest FernOn Googling this vegetable’s Chinese name, I discovered its English name is Bird’s Nest Fern! Imagine that, eating a fern.  I wonder if this is the same Bird’s Nest fern that is ubiquitous in South East Asia.  It can be found growing on the trees by the roadside, or in forested areas in countries like Malaysia and Singapore where I come from…. Well, nobody I know in Singapore has ever bothered to harvest the Bird’s Nest fern to eat. I wonder if this Taiwanese Shan Shu vegetable is the edible kind and the Bird’s Nest Fern of my Singaporean childhood is the inedible kind.

In any case, they don’t know what they are missing – a delightfully crunchy vegetable stir fried with fresh cut chili and small fish, done in the Taiwanese way.

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2 bundles of Bird’s Nest Fern – washed and cut into bite sized pieces
1 chili – cut into slivers
5 Tbsp small fish (anchovies or ikan bilis)
2 cloves garlic – peeled and sliced
2 Tbsp preserved black beans or garlic black bean sauce
3 Tbsp oyster sauce
1 -2 Tbsp cooking oil

Method:

1. Blanch the Bird’s Nest Fern in boiling water for 5 seconds, drain and keep aside.
2. Rinse and pat dry the small fish. Stir fry the small fish, chili, black beans and garlic in 1 to 2 Tbsp cooking oil, using low heat.
3. Add in the Bird’s Nest Fern. Mix in the oyster sauce. Stir fry quickly using high heat.  Add a few tablespoons of water if it is dry.  Do not overcook the Bird’s Nest Fern as it will turn brown.
4. Dish up and serve with rice.

See stunning pictures of Taroko National Park here:

https://lingmongcha.wordpress.com/2015/01/17/one-day-in-hualien-part-1-incredible-breathtaking-stunning-taroko-gorge-and-taroko-national-park/

https://lingmongcha.wordpress.com/2015/01/18/one-day-in-hualien-part-2-incredible-breathtaking-stunning-taroko-gorge-and-taroko-national-park/

 

 

 

Taiwanese Pickled Tomatoes

Last week I went to a wedding banquet at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Taipei and they served this simply lovely cold tomato appetizer. It was 89 degrees outside …  this was very refreshing indeed for a hot summer day!  A fellow guest gave me her recipe for it. I went home and tried it.  It was very easy and I must say pickling really improves the flavor of the tomatoes!

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dried plum
Dried Plums

1 cup of cherry tomatoes (washed and drained)
2/3 cup of water
2 tsp brown sugar
2 Tbsp dried plum (話梅) (about 4 whole dried plums)
1 cup of rice vinegar
3 small and fresh mint leaves (optional)

  1. Using a sharp knife, make a plus (+) score on the side of each tomato.
  2. Fill a pot half way with water and 1/3 cup of vinegar and bring to a boil.
  3. Put the tomatoes into the pot of hot water and let them sit for 5 seconds.
  4. Drain the water, remove the skins of the tomatoes and leave them in the refrigerator to chill.
  5. In a separate pot, heat up 1/3 cup of water, rice vinegar, brown sugar and dried plums and simmer for 5 minutes.
  6. Allow the liquid to chill, then place the tomatoes in the liquid, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least half a day.

Note:  I wanted to keep the tomato skins on, so I skipped steps 2,3 and 4

Fried Small Fish with Peanuts

It’s been one year since I moved to Taiwan. In a previous post, I promised I will write about my food adventures in Taiwan. Taiwanese cuisine is many things. It’s not just the ubiquitous beef noodle, or the fried oyster omelet, or the sweet and vinegary three cup chicken. It is also the sweetest mango shaved ice, the refreshing pearl milk tea and many more regional specialties.

One of my first meals in Taipei was at a restaurant that served classic Taiwanese food. The food was very good and the dishes were delicious. I loved this fried, small fish with peanuts best. It was good to eat alone or with rice or porridge. It was addictive! When I came across these small fish sold fresh at the local market, I just had to buy them to experiment how to make this dish at home.

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Ingredients
80 g (3 oz) tiny white fish
50 g (3.5 oz) peanuts
6 Tbsp vegetable oil
1 red chili, sliced into small slivers
1 stalk spring onion, chopped into small pieces
3 cloves garlic, chopped roughly
1 tsp rice wine
Pinch salt and pepper to taste
1 tsp sugar (optional)

Method

1. Heat 4 tbsp oil in a frying pan, and stir fry the fish for a few minutes, until it is cooked. Remove and drain.
2. Heat the frying pan, add about 2 tablespoons of the oil and stir fry the chili, garlic and rice wine for a minute. Add the fish, peanuts, salt, pepper and sugar (optional) and stir fry for 5 minutes.